Executive Faculty Committee

James Evans

Director, Knowledge Lab; Professor, Sociology, University of Chicago; Fellow, Computation Institute; Faculty Director, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

(773) 702-9168
5757 S. University Avenue, Saieh Hall 252

Dr. Evans is the Director of the Knowledge Lab; a Fellow in the Computation Institute; and the Faculty Director for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program.  In addition to his leadership duties, Dr. Evans is a Professor in Sociology with research that focuses on the collective system of thinking and knowing, ranging from the distribution of attention and intuition, the origin of ideas and shared habits of reasoning to processes of agreement (and dispute), accumulation of certainty (and doubt), and the texture—novelty, ambiguity, topology—of human understanding. He is especially interested in innovation—how new ideas and practices emerge—and the role that social and technical institutions (e.g., the Internet, markets, collaborations) play in collective cognition and discovery.  For more information, visit his homepage.


Luc Anselin

Stein-Freiler Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology and the College, Director, Center for Spatial Data Science, Senior Fellow, NORC; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program


Dr. Anselin, is a Senior Fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago in the Academic Research Centers. An expert in spatial econometrics, Anselin is currently Regents' Professor, Walter Isard Chair, and was the founding director of the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University. He previously held appointments at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; the University of Texas at Dallas; West Virginia University; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the Ohio State University. Anselin's focus in the analysis of spatial data (i.e., data containing a specific location) ranging from exploration to visualization and modeling. Anselin looks at the development of appropriate methods, their implementation in open source software and application in empirical studies. Specific application fields include environmental and natural resource economics, real estate economics, economics of innovation, criminology, public health, electoral studies and international relations. For more information, visit his homepage.


Marc G. Berman

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Berman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and is involved in the Cognition, Social and Integrative Neuroscience programs. Understanding the relationship between individual psychological and neural processing and environmental factors lies at the heart of my research. For more information, visit his homepage.


Kathleen Cagney

Associate Professor, Sociology; Health Studies Director, Population Research Center, NORC; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Cagney is an Associate Professor in Sociology; Health Studies Director at the  Population Research Center, NORC; and an Executive Committee Member for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program.  Her work examines social inequality and its relationship to health with a focus on neighborhood, race, and aging and the life course. She has developed a series of papers on neighborhood social capital and its relationship to outcomes such as self-rated health, asthma prevalence, physical activity, and mortality during the 1995 Chicago heat wave. She also focuses on the validity of such measures and the development of new neighborhood-based metrics that reflect the perceptions and experiences of older residents.  Currently she works on two Chicago-based studies of neighborhood context and older adult health, and is examining the role of the social and physical environment in older adult well-being with the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project.  For more information, visit her homepage.


Justin Grimmer

Associate Professor of Political Science and the College; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Grimmer is an associate professor of political science and the College, and an Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program. He transitions to UChicago in the fall of 2017. His research examines how representation occurs in American politics using new statistical methods. His first book Representational Style in Congress: What Legislators Say and Why It Matters (Cambridge University Press, 2013) shows how senators define the type of representation they provide constituents and how this affects constituents' evaluations and won the Fenno Prize from the legislative studies section.  His second book The Impression of Influence: How Legislator Communication and Government Spending Cultivate a Personal Vote (Princeton University Press, with Sean J. Westwood and Solomon Messing) demonstrates how legislators ensure they receive credit for government actions.  His work has appeared in the American Political Science ReviewAmerican Journal of Political ScienceJournal of PoliticsPolitical AnalysisProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Regulation and Governance, and other journals.  For more information, please visit his homepage.

 


Guanglei Hong

Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Human Development and the College Committee on Education

Dr. Hong is an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Human Development and the College; and the Committee on Education.  She has focused her research on developing causal inference theories and methods for evaluating educational and social policies and programs in multi-level, longitudinal settings. Her work addresses issues including (1) how to conceptualize and evaluate the causal effects of treatments when individual responses to alternative treatments depend on various features of the organizational settings, (2) how to adjust for selection bias in estimating the effects of concurrent multi-valued treatments, (3) how to evaluate the cumulative effects of time-varying treatments, and (4) how to conceptualize and analyze the causal mediation mechanisms.  For more information, visit her homepage.


Ali Hortaçsu

Ralph and Mary Otis Isham Professor in Economics and the College (at Chicago since 2001); Editor, Journal of Political Economy; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Hortaçsu's work is focused on empirically assessing the efficiency of markets, utilizing detailed micro-level data from the markets he studies to estimate preference and technology parameters that rationalize individual behavior and then use the estimated preferences and technological parameters to construct (constrained) “efficient” benchmarks and assess how far observed market outcomes are from efficiency. This framework has been applied to many market settings, including financial markets, energy markets, and the Internet, and a variety of market clearing mechanisms, including auctions, matching, and costly search. His current research interests include: Industrial organization; auctions; search and matching models; production and financial networks; applications in finance, energy markets and the internet. For more information, visit his homepage.


Leslie M. Kay

Professor of Psychology; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Kay has been at The University of Chicago since 2000, and her laboratory studies olfactory and limbic system neurophysiology, focusing on the mechanisms and functions associated with intra- and inter-regional oscillatory cooperativity.  Professoer Kay received her BA in Liberal Arts from St. John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico and then worked for the original GenBank project at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1982-85. She worked as a programmer/analyst in business applications for a number of years in the mid- to late eighties, and then returned to graduate school at UC Berkeley. She completed her dissertation research in the laboratory of Walter J. Freeman, and received her PhD in Biophysics in 1995. Her postdoctoral research was completed in the laboratory of Gilles Laurent at the California Institute of Technology, where she studied olfactory bulb mitral cell responses to changes in odor context. For more information, visit her homepage.


Howard Nusbaum

Professor, Department of Psychology and in the College; Committee on Computational Neuroscience; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Nusbaum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and in the College; Committee on Computational Neuroscience; and an Executive Committee Member of the Masters in Computational Social Science Program.  His research interests include: wisdom, language use, attention, learning, memory consolidation and sleep, working memory, understanding, affect, categorization, cognitive neuropharmocology, cognitive engineering and human factors. For more information, visit his homepage.


John Padgett

Professor, Department of Political Science and the College; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Padgett is a Professor in Political Science and the College, specializing in American politics, organizational theory, mathematical models, and public policy. He also serves as an Executive Committee Member for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program.  He is best known for his models of the federal budget process, although he has written on a variety of topics. The American Journal of Sociology published both his 1993 article "Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434" and his 1985 essay "The Emergent Organization of Plea Bargaining." He is a Director of the Organizations and State-Building Workshop.  For more information, visit his homepage.


Elizabeth Maggie Penn

Professor of Political Science and the College; Managing Editor, Social Choice and Welfare; Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Penn is a formal political theorist whose work focuses on social choice theory and political institutions. She regularly teaches undergraduate courses on electoral systems and agent-based modeling as well as graduate courses on positive political theory. Her work has been published with Cambridge University Press and in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Journal of Theoretical Politics, Mathematical & Computer Modelling, Political Analysis, Political Science Research & Methods, PS: Political Science and Politics, Public Choice, Social Choice & Welfare, The Good Society, and Complexity. For more information, visit her homepage.


Stephen W. Raudenbush

Lewis-Sebring Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Sociology, the College, and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies; Chair, Committee on Education, Executive Committee Member, Masters in Computational Social Science Program

Dr. Raudenbush is the Lewis-Sebring Distinguished Service Professor for the  Department of Sociology, the College, and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies.  He is also the Chair of the Committee on Education and an Executive Committee Member for the Masters in Computational Social Science Program.  His research interests include EducationSocial TheoryInequalityUrban Sociology, Family, Neighborhood, School, Classroom, Early and Middle Childhood, Adolescence, Causal Inference, and Educational Disparities.  For more information, visit his homepage.